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AGOURA HIGH SCHOOL NAMED AN IB WORLD SCHOOL - FEB. 2009

Congratulations to the AHS IB Class of 2014!
Over $200,000 in scholarships awarded
Hayley Bosworth - University of Oklahoma, Norman
Phillip Braun - New York University
Grant Feitshans - Denison University
Aleksandr Filippov - State University of New York, Albany
Christina Greico - Chapman University
Laila Naraghi - University of Southern California
Ryan Shahid - Georgia Institute of Technology

NEWSFLASH:


~IB External Exam Registration
2015 IB External Exam Registration Forms and Payments are due to Program Coordinator Carrie McClellan in D4 by 10/31/14.

~AHS IB SELF STUDY: 
 The AHS IB Program Evaluation by the IBO will be due to the IBO December 2015.  The IB Program needs your help in completing our Self-Study for the Evaluation. The 2009-2014 Agoura High School IB Program Self-Study Survey needs to be completed by Pre-IB/IB students and parents by October 31st.  If you could please do the survey that would be wonderful. It will only take 10 minutes. Survey results will be available through our website upon completion of the Self-Study.  REMINDER:  AFTER YOU COMPLETE THE SURVEY: PRINT THE COMPLETION CONFIRMATION AND DROP OFF TO MRS. MCCLELLAN IN D4 TO BE ENTERED TO WIN A $50 DOLLAR STARBUCKS GIFT CARD AND A $50 DOLLAR MENCHIES GIFT CARD!!!



phone: [818] 889.1262 x 537



 
 "The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable
and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world
through intercultural understanding and respect.

To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international
organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and
rigorous assessment.

These programmes encourage students across the world to become active,
compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people,
with their differences, can also be right."
 
 


AHS IB DP Brochure
AHS IB DP Student and Parent Guide

IB Course Worksheet

(please schedule an appointment to complete this form)

IBO Documents:
Diploma Program Flyer
IB DP Brochure
IB DP and University Preparation
IB Learner Profile
IB By the Numbers
General Regulations: for students and their legal guardians

 
 

 
2014 Summer Assignments:
preIB English 1 (9th grade)
preIB English 2 (10th grade)
preIB Algebra 2
IB English HL1 (11th grade)
IB English HL2 (12th grade)
IB History HL2 (11th grade)
IB Psychology SL
IB Physics SL
IB Math SL
IB Film HL1 (11th grade)


IB in the News:

International Baccalaureate program coming to Agoura High...
Advanced learning program comes to AHS...
Baccalaureate program broadens teen minds...
First IB students to graduate...

IB Education Prepares Students for Success...
How to Bring Our Schools Out of the 20th Century...
In AP-vs-IB Debate, A Win for the Students...
International Program Catches On in US Schools...

Some feedback from the parents of former and current IB students:
 

"Dear Andrew,

Hello. Just a bit of early feedback.

My son [D] has talked with us a lot about the IB program.
During the summer [D] was excited about the possibilities of this new program,
but he was also wondering if it would be truly different than high school as he knew it.

Well, just a couple weeks into the year, [D] is enjoying school.
He really appreciates the fact that class is not all notes and memorization,
but rather lots of open discussion and intellectual participation.

So even though this is early in the year to make conclusions,
it would seem that the students who signed up for the IB program
are going to be a part of an educational approach that can potentially
have an big impact on their lives. If this can make high school interesting to the kids,
rather than drudgery, then the IB program will be something pretty amazing.

Best Regards, [J]"
(Sept 10, 2009)

I wanted to let you know how much [K] has loved being a part of IB.  Her dad and I have watched her expand her world with knowledge and tolerance.  She has learned how and continues to be an active contributor to our community and the planet.  Her passion for learning is endless and her realization of her role as a human being, who has the power to lead and influence others in a positive way, is a magnificent example of the power of an IB education.
Thank you so much for your tireless enthusiasm!

Best-- [J]
(March 15, 2012)


Some video testimonies from IB grads...


what is Internationalism?

From the IB perspective, internationalism is the development of "responsible citizens of the world" with young people who are active participants in their local and national communities, as well as in the broader international community. IB emphasizes education of the whole person and focuses on the development of critical thinking and language skills necessary for success in the global community. Students are taught to be international and active learners as described in the IB Learner Profile. They are well-rounded individuals and engaged citizens, who gain practical experience by being part of an international community.

Q. What does it mean to be "international"?
"· Genuine awareness of the interdependence of countries and peoples.
"· Ability to see one's own culture, language and nation in a global perspective
"· Ability to recognize and rejoice in diversity

Q. What does it mean to be a "responsible citizen of the world"?
"· Conservation of natural resources
"· Responsible use of power
"· Understanding needs of those less fortunate
"· Responding to disasters

what is the Learner Profile?

The IB learner profile is the IBO mission statement translated into a set of learning outcomes for the 21st century. The attributes of the profile express the values inherent to the IB continuum of international education: these are values that should infuse all elements of the Primary Years Programme (PYP), Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme and, therefore, the culture and ethos of all IB World Schools. The learner profile provides a long-term vision of education. It is a set of ideals that can inspire, motivate and focus the work of schools and teachers, uniting them in a common purpose.

IB programmes promote the education of the whole person, emphasizing intellectual, personal, emotional and social growth through all domains of knowledge. By focusing on the dynamic combination of knowledge, skills, independent critical and creative thought and international-mindedness, the IBO espouses the principle of educating the whole person for a life of active, responsible citizenship. Underlying the three programmes is the concept of education of the whole person as a lifelong process. The learner profile is a profile of the whole person as a lifelong learner.

As a key cross-programme component, the learner profile will become the central tenet of the IB programmes and central to the definition of what it means to be internationally minded. Thus, the IBO is placing the focus for schools where it belongs: on learning. It is not intended to be a profile of the perfect student; rather, it can be considered as a map of a lifelong journey in pursuit of international-mindedness.

It places the learner firmly at the heart of IB programmes and focuses attention on the processes and the outcomes of learning. It is the IBO's intention that the learner profile will help develop coherence within and across the three programmes. It provides a clear and explicit statement of what is expected of students, teachers and school administrators in terms of learning, and what is expected of parents in terms of support for that learning.

what is the IB Diploma Programme?

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Programme is a challenging two-year curriculum, primarily aimed at students aged 16 to 19. It leads to a qualification that is widely recognized by the world's leading universities.

Students learn more than a collection of facts. The Diploma Programme prepares students for university and encourages them to:
"· ask challenging questions
"· learn how to learn
"· develop a strong sense of their own identity and culture
"· develop the ability to communicate with and understand people from other countries and cultures


The curriculum contains six subject groups together with a core made up of three separate parts.

This is illustrated by a hexagon with the three parts of the core at its centre.

DP-Eng

Students study six subjects selected from the subject groups. Normally three subjects are studied at higher level (courses representing 240 teaching hours), and the remaining three subjects are studied at standard level (courses representing 150 teaching hours).

All three parts of the core-extended essay, theory of knowledge and creativity, action, service-are compulsory and are central to the philosophy of the Diploma Programme.

Group 1 - English A1 HL
Group 2 - Spanish B SL/HL; French B SL/HL; Chinese B SL/HL
Group 3 - History HL (History of the Americas/20th Century Global Studies); Psychology SL; Social & Cultural Anthropology SL; Environmental Systems & Societies SL
Group 4 - Environmental Systems & Societies SL; Physics SL
Group 5 - Math SL
Group 6 - Visual Arts SL/HL; Film HL
core - Theory of Knowledge

what is the course sequencing?

(The following is a typical course sequence for IB students.
Adjustments can be made to accommodate students' needs and interests)

For more information on individual courses, including prerequisites, consult the AHS Course Catalog

*Note: IB students may take Chemistry in 10th grade provided they meet the following conditions:
-received A's both semesters in Biology (9th grade)
-are concurrently enrolled in Pre-IB Algebra II


GROUP DIPLOMA COURSE GRADE
9
GRADE
10
GRADE
11
GRADE
12
[I]
LANGUAGE A1
ENGLISH
HL
English
I (H)
English
II (H)
ENGLISH
IB HL1
ENGLISH
IB HL2
[II]
LANGUAGE B
SPANISH
SL
Spanish
I
Spanish
II
SPANISH
IB SL1
SPANISH
IB SL2
  SPANISH
HL
Spanish
II
Spanish
III
SPANISH
IB HL1
SPANISH
IB HL2
  FRENCH
SL
French
I
French
II
FRENCH
IB SL1
FRENCH
IB SL2
  FRENCH
HL
French
II
French
III
FRENCH
IB HL1
FRENCH
IB HL2
  CHINESE
SL
Chinese
I
Chinese
II
CHINESE
IB SL1
CHINESE
IB SL2
[III]
INDIVIDUALS
& SOCIETIES
HISTORY
HL
World
Cultures & Geography or AP Human Geography
World History or AP European History HISTORY
IB HL1
(HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS)

HISTORY
IB HL2
(20TH CENTURY GLOBAL STUDIES)

HISTORY
SL
World
Cultures & Geography or AP Human Geography
World History or AP European History US History or AP US History
HISTORY
IB SL
(20TH CENTURY GLOBAL STUDIES)
  PSYCHOLOGY
SL
- - (one year)
PSYCHOLOGY
IB SL
(one year)
PSYCHOLOGY
IB SL
  SOCIAL & CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
SL
- - (one year)
SOCIAL & CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
IB SL
(one year)
SOCIAL & CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
IB SL

ENVIRONMENTAL
SYSTEMS &
SOCIETIES
SL
Biology Chemistry* ENVIRONMENTAL
SYSTEMS &
SOCIETIES
IB SL
Physics
[IV]
EXPERIMENTAL
SCIENCES
ENVIRONMENTAL
SYSTEMS &
SOCIETIES
SL
Biology Chemistry* ENVIRONMENTAL
SYSTEMS &
SOCIETIES
IB SL
Physics

PHYSICS
SL
Biology Chemistry* ENVIRONMENTAL
SYSTEMS &
SOCIETIES
IB SL
PHYSICS
IB SL
[V]
MATHEMATICS
MATH
SL
pre-IB Geometry pre-IB Algebra II MATH
IB SL
Calculus AB
    Algebra pre-IB Geometry pre-IB Algebra II MATH
IB SL
[VI]
ELECTIVE
VISUAL ARTS
HL
______________

FILM
HL
-

________


-
-

________


-
VISUAL ARTS
IB HL1
______________

FILM
IB HL1
VISUAL ARTS
IB HL1
______________

FILM
IB HL1
CORE
(THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE)

- -

Government /
ToK1

ToK2 /
Economics

 

how are students assessed?

At the end of the two-year programme, students are assessed both internally and externally in ways that measure individual performance against stated objectives for each subject.

Internal assessment: In nearly all subjects at least some of the assessment is carried out internally by teachers, who mark individual pieces of work produced as part of a course of study. Examples include oral exercises in language subjects, projects, student portfolios, class presentations, practical laboratory work, mathematical investigations and artistic performances.

External assessment: Some assessment tasks are conducted and overseen by teachers without the restrictions of examination conditions, but are then marked externally by examiners. Examples include world literature assignments for language A1, written tasks for language A2, essays for theory of knowledge and extended essays.

Because of the greater degree of objectivity and reliability provided by the standard examination environment, externally marked examinations form the greatest share of the assessment for each subject. The grading system is criterion based (results are determined by performance against set standards, not by each student's position in the overall rank order); validity, reliability and fairness are the watchwords of the Diploma Programme's assessment strategy.

what is ToK?

The Theory of Knowledge (ToK) course is at the center of the experience of the Diploma Programme for the IB student. The focus of ToK is on the student as knower. At the heart of the course is an appreciation for the myriad ways in which students learn and for the wealth of knowledge they have already attained. As opposed to other courses, which rely on students' interests and prior knowledge in order to accumulate more knowledge, ToK offers students the opportunity to critically examine their knowledge as such. Questions such as: What do I know? How do I know what I claim to know? and What are the limits of my knowledge? frame the course.

The aims of ToK are to encourage students to:
"· develop a passion for learning by encouraging and duly rewarding their pursuit of knowledge in the various disciplines,
"· critically examine their knowledge claims and reflect on their experiences as learners,
"· foster an appreciation for the diverse ways in which people think, learn, and claim to know,
"· consider the perspectives of members of other communities both local and global,
"· and, understand that ultimately, with knowledge comes responsibility and that as students discover what in fact they do know, there is an inherent requirement to effect change both locally and globally.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:
"· critically analyze and effectively communicate knowledge claims in and across various disciplines,
"· ask questions that show an appreciation for the transdisciplinary nature of knowledge as such,
"· appreciate the diversity of national and international perspectives on knowledge claims,
"· and honestly and accurately reflect on their own knowledge as such, and on their knowledge as it contributes to the universal collection of knowledge.


Participation in the school's CAS programme encourages students to be involved in artistic pursuits, sports, and community service work, thus fostering students' awareness and appreciation of life outside the academic arena.

Students will pursue 50 hours of Creative projects, participate in 50 hours of Active events, and complete 50 hours of Service

These hours are to be done over the course of the Programme.

The IB Diploma is a passport to higher education. Universities around the world welcome the unique characteristics of IB Diploma Programme students and recognize the way in which the programme helps to prepare students for university level education.

IB students routinely gain admission to some of the best known universities in the world. Most of these institutions have established recognition policies for the IB diploma.

Parents and students are encouraged to research the specific policies of particular universities.

For more information visit www.ibo.org/diploma or contact Carrie McClellan [AHS IB DP Coordinator]